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The Hidden Review: My name is Giancarlo Siani - Documentary review

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"Ah you want to become like Giancarlo Siani" "Be careful not to die as Giancarlo Siani" The THR has been at the XX1V edition of Napoli Film Festival 2023, where it premiered the documentary "My Name is Giancarlo Siani", written and directed by Giuseppe Alessio Nuzzo. The documentary talks about the moving real-life story of a Neapolitan journalist called Giancarlo Siani, murdered at 26 years old for the best journalism service he was delivering against the criminal groups, which are characterizing Naples's struggle to this day. The documentary explains well from the beginning his story and how he got into journalism to help increase the volume of speaking the truth about politics and criminal activities. In particular, to share about Camorra's actions, which is still an issue in the Campania region, and there are continuous fights against the expansion of its illegal activities. In fact, he had the skills to go deeper and deeper in telling the trut

The Hidden Review: 12 Repliche - Film Review

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"God gives his hardest battles to his strongest soldiers." The THR has been at the XX1V edition of Napoli Film Festival 2023, where it premiered the movie "12 Shows" (12 repliche) written and directed by Gianfranco Gallo starring Gianfranco Gallo, Gianni Parisi, Gianluca Di Gennaro, Roberto Azzurro, Elvis Esposito, Peppe Miale, Mariacarla Casillo, Lisa Imperatore, Margherita Di Rauso, Franco Javarone, Ester Geatta. "12 repliche" is an LGBTQ independent Feature Film drama produced by Maxadv with support from the Film Commission Regione Campania, and has had some Festival runs, winning in Montreal as Best Feature Film and Gianfranco Gallo won Best Actor. Furthermore, the movie takes place in Naples, set in 2016, the same year as CirinnĂ 's law in a phase of approbation for LGBTQ rights. However, the story focuses more on its lead character, Andrea Michelini, a veteran theatremaker who is openly Gay and in a relationship with longtime theatre company memb

The Hidden Review: Bonding - Theatre Review

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  The THR has watched a one-man show called 'Bonding', written and performed by Cyril Blake at The Hen & Chickens Theatre, which played three nights as part of the Camden Fringe. Blake plays Stephen Lewis, a self-confessed 'struggling' actor who loves James Bond; a love which he has inherited from his dad. It is a beautifully told story that deals with the special moments and sometimes challenging bond within the relationship between dads and sons. Blake's character talks to the audience in an energetic and often humorous manner, and asks the audience questions about their knowledge of the Bond franchise with great banter and rapport. Throughout the play, there are references to James Bond's character, and even if one isn't a fan, it enthuses and enlightens. The part when he recounts going to see the Bond films with his dad after his mother's death is touching as he pretends there's 'something in his eye' as he doesn't want to show he

The Hidden Review: After all these years - Theatre Review

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THR has watched After All These Years at The Jermyn Street Theatre. The play, written by Giles Cole, won the Outstanding Theatre Award at The Brighton Fringe. All These Years is a play divided into three acts and tells the story of relationships between two couples, now residing in a seaside town, as they reminisce over their lives and friendships over the years. Moreover, starring four seasoned actors, Jeffery Holland (best known from TV’s ‘Hi-De-Hi’), Judy Buxton, Carol Ball, and Graham Poutney (who also directs), all at the top of their games and very much at home on stage. Throughout the play, the characters had known each other for quite some time and were all in show business at one point. Act 1 reflects on the two male friends, Alfred and Charlie, in a local pub and shows a fantastic bond between them as they banter about their lives and the woes of getting older. Then the following acts play out with the two women, taking place in one of their homes after a swift se

The Hidden Review: Love is Blue - Theatre Review

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  The THR has watched Love is Blue playing at The Drayton Arms Theatre from July 20th-22nd, just before heading to the Edinburgh Fringe. This two-hander, part of four plays produced by LAMBCO Productions, is about an unlikely encounter between a slick city trader and a young man who is homeless and he helps out by inviting him back to his loft apartment for a shower and some food. The two leads are very engaging as they explore their new-found understanding of each other’s pasts; Olly is an older man who is quite a drinker as he is grieving for his late boyfriend. The more introspective and somewhat naive younger man reveals his childhood trauma of being abandoned at six months old and adopted by a religious family. Furthermore, the director Prav MJ follows a stylish direction as it takes us on an emotional roller coaster journey. The characters live out their attraction to each other and reveal, more and more, a respective pain blossoming into a friendship. At the same time, the songs

The Hidden Review: So...you knew? - Theatre Review

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  "So...you knew?" The THR watched at the Barons Court Theatre "So...you knew?" written by Bart Bartolini and directed by Maria Cristina Petitti. During a week of mixed weather, it was very apt to see a solo show dealing with the climate change crisis that was told in such a powerfully uplifting way. The performer Bart Bartolini is terrific as he takes us on an energetic, funny and thought-provoking journey from the early eighties to the present day and beyond into the future, playing various characters with great confidence and charisma. Primarily Willie, a former scientist who uncovers the truth about carbon dioxide emissions while working at Essen Mobil and balancing life with his wife and child. Moreover, using a backdrop projector adds a very engaging multidimensional aspect to the show, whilst the lighting and overall design, at times overwhelming, keep the audience intrigued and mesmerised. At the same time, the director Maria Cristina Petitti uses some inter

The Hidden Review: Bubu Killer King - Theatre Review

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The Hidden Review has watched "Bubu Killer King" at Babolin Theatre, online theatre is odd, but, when executed well, it can be used to great effect. The challenge of an unknown medium poses a lot of opportunities, and Babolin Theatre takes this to the extreme in an exciting way. Bubu Killer King is ludicrous, absurd and comical, but much like a lot of Babolin's work, underneath this is a sharp satire, witty political commentary and a strong creative force. Bubu Killer King is essentially an unconventional interpretation of the Alfred Jarry classic 'Ubu Roi', and the banal absurdism of Jarry lends itself to a deconstructed theatre performance. At its core, it is a parody of Macbeth, which goes off the rails fairly quickly. The show is performed in solo performances which allow you to stumble your own way through the already confusing narrative of Ubu. While this presented an opportunity for differing perspectives and subplots, the story became hard to follow and co